For more great posts from The Crochet Cafe, subscribe here!

You have Successfully Subscribed!

How to Read a Crochet Chart

By on January 10, 2016

Chart graphic

When I first started to crochet, charts terrified me. I avoided any pattern with a chart and wanted nothing to do with them. But, I’ve changed my ways. I’ve slowly practiced and learned and now I really appreciate a chart for what it is, a visual representation of a crochet pattern. The benefit of a chart is that, once you can understand the symbols, you can tell exactly how the stitch pattern will work up. Now what do those symbols mean? Here is a stitch guide.

chart_crochet

For more Patterns, Tips, and Tutorials, subscribe to our posts HERE!

Never miss another post from The Crochet Cafe!

You have Successfully Subscribed!


 

Once you understand what each symbol means, take a look at this post from Craftsy.com: Understanding Crochet Diagrams: The Key to Breaking the Code

Understanding-Diagrams-Title-Image

If you are a chart newbie, I recommend 2 patterns that will really help you to practice your chart reading skills.

The Harlequin Scarf by A la Sascha is made in one piece with a few colors for a beautiful finished project. It has both written directions and a chart. This scarf uses only basic stitches so it is a great beginning chart pattern.

Harlequin Scarf by A la Sascha

The DreamCatcher Shawl by A la Sascha looks complicated but it is just a series of chains and double crochet. It has a written pattern and a chart. Dreamcatcher Shawl by A la Sascha

 

How do you feel about charts? Have you tried to work from a chart before? Let me know in the comments 🙂 Should we do some more chart tutorials?

Happy Crocheting!

~Emily

About Emily Truman

Emily is the Assistant Editor at Happily Hooked Magazine and the owner at Em's Corner. She is a WAHM with 4 kids. She has a passion for crochet and sharing the art with others.

9 Comments

  1. BearMtn

    January 14, 2016 at 3:10 pm

    I prefer symbol Crochet rather than text. It’s a universal language which is used all over the world! I can read virtually any pattern, whether it be in Portuguese, Swedish, German, Greek or even Japanese!!

  2. Marsha

    January 14, 2016 at 3:38 pm

    I love the large illustration and the explanations. Extremely helpful. Please do more on charts.

  3. Lynne

    January 14, 2016 at 3:54 pm

    Charts are terrifying and confusing! I’ve crashed on the rocky shoals of charts several times and I don’t think that there is any hope of being able to successfully complete even the simplest project from a chart.

  4. chrissy

    January 15, 2016 at 10:37 pm

    Do more on charts!!!! I have many chart patterns from my. Grandma and great grandma and dont understand any of them…

    • Emily Truman

      January 18, 2016 at 4:55 pm

      Thanks for the feedback! I will put some more info together!

  5. Doris Honeman

    January 16, 2016 at 3:54 pm

    I’ve been trying to figure out a chart for an Eiffel Tower for a while and been unable to!!! I’ll see if this helps me. Thanks

  6. Irene Harrison

    January 19, 2016 at 5:40 am

    Dear Emily
    such help, thank you so much, although more new charts will be so useful for the beginners ( as I am ).
    Irene

    • Emily Truman

      January 20, 2016 at 4:02 pm

      You’re very welcome! I will put together some more tutorials!

  7. suzanne

    January 21, 2016 at 4:11 pm

    where get those pretty needles?

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *